Jan 12, 2018 in Medicine

How Advance Nursing Practice Has Had an Impact in Diabetes treatment and Management

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA) (2007), Diabetes Mellitus (DM) refers to a group of diseases, which includes gestational DM, pre-DM, medication-induced DM, type 1 DM, and type 2 DM. All of them are set apart by high levels of blood glucose. The disease is very rampant in the US – it affects more than 24 million people. The saddening part is that about a third of those with diabetes do not even know about their condition. By the year 2000, DM constituted the 6th leading cause of casualty in the US (heart disease was the leading cause of deaths that relate to diabetes). A lot of research has been carried out towards the treatment and management of this endemic condition. Though new, advance nursing practice has proven to have an impact in the treatment of DM, as well as its management.

According to recent research, keeping blood glucose levels and result as close to usual as possible can delay or prevent many of the costs and implications linked to DM. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial Research Group (1993) conducted a classic randomized clinical attempt and the result were that maintenance of blood glucose as close to usual as possible decelerates the beginning and development of diabetes-linked kidney, eye, and nerve illnesses. According to the findings, eye disease reduced by 76 percent, kidney illnesses by half, and nerve disease by 60 percent. The study also showed how any continuous lowering of blood glucose has certain positive effects.

One form of advanced Nursing Practice is the Evidence-Based Practice Protocol (EBPP) meant to aid progress glucose control in people with Type 2 DM. There are certain theories involved with such measures; however, the theory of self-care was linked to the EBPP because those suffering from type 2 DM have to stick on to self-care treatment plans so as to maintain health, life, their well-being, and general development as evident in the stability of blood sugar and advanced glycemic control. The Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) served as one approach to smooth the progress of self-care (Evans, 2010).

Notably, there were certain benefits of going through with the guidelines in the above approach, including the prospect for the finest management of DM, which involve advanced glycemic control and appropriate management and prevention of complications linked with diabetes. However, the risks involved with following the guidelines under this approach included severe weight gain and hypoglycemia, which is credited to the advanced glycemic control. Other risks would include fluid retention for those that receive oral thiazolidinediones and liver dysfunction from satin therapy.  

The EBPP posted a noteworthy reduction in FBG result of 72 mg/dL, which correlated to a 2 percent decrease in hemoglobin. The APN intervention proved to be a successful form of intervention in any reviewed literature because of the educational knowledge involved in the approach as well as the training of APNs. In essence, an APN shows a high level of proficiency in diagnosing, assessing, and treating intricate health responses of groups, individuals, and communities (Evans, 2010).

To conclude, through the standpoint of APNs competent skills, interventions are dependent on greater depth and breadth of knowledge as well as a honed capability to synthesize social, psychological, physiological, and environmental data. The Evidence-Based Practice Protocol (EBPP) aided the progress glucose control in people with Type 2 DM in various ways. The theory of self-care ensured that individuals with type 2 DM followed the self-care treatment plans so as to maintain health, life, their well-being, and general development as evident in the stability of blood sugar and advanced glycemic control. The success of APN intervention proves the point that advance nursing practice has an impact in the treatment of DM, as well as its management.

Related essays