Jan 12, 2018 in Law

Criminal Investigation

Unknown person roamed Kensington, leaving the trail of blood behind. Violent kills of three women shocked community – Elaine Goldberg, 21, Nicole Piacentini, 35, and Casey Mahoney, 27, found near the city, dead, half-nude. The police department engaged an investigation, including DNA analysis, old-fashioned police work and cooperation among different police units (Homicide, Special victims, Citywide Vice, etc.).

Not all of the victims died. Some of them reported to the police that they survived the attack; one of them even stabbed the killer with scissors. In addition, cameras’ video provided a description – Hispanic male in his twenties. No data appeared after checking scissors for the DNA match. During check, departments started a close cooperation with the FBI department, which provided them with the program that helped to compare clues and tips found by other officers. Meanwhile, City Vice department workers posed themselves as prostitutes to gather more data. That was sufficient because victims were into using drugs and wandering the streets, so prostitutes could provide information on the killer. Casey Mahoney was one of them. Charged numerous times for delivering drugs and had been addicted to heroin, she still was a very kind, generous person. She always wanted to study in college and get rid of her addiction (Nelson, 2010). Nevertheless, she was strongly addicted, and that led her to death. Hispanic or black males never dated prostitutes (Graham, 2011). Somehow, the Hispanic male appeared and took away Casey. The police found her body on December, 15. At last, after months of search, the DNA sample check gave a match. The police department did not hesitate, and the Kensington Strangler was finally arrested – Antonio Rodriguez, 22, released after giving his DNA sample, due to carrying drugs on October, 21. When the police officers arrived, he did not try to escape the arrest.

He passed another DNA check that proved he was the murderer. The court convicted Antonio Rodriguez for three life sentences.

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